Don’t Freak Out

We had our follow-up with the doctor today.

Everything is looking pretty good. She’s lost a little weight but she doesn’t seem dehydrated. We’ll need to follow with him again in a week to be sure she isn’t still losing weight. She still has a little junk in the upper portions of her lungs but she’s responsive, active and eating well.

The company I work for is amazing. One of the provisions of my benefits package is that I’m allowed time away to be with family in times of illness or other extended family emergencies (like this one). I have some paperwork to fill out. To this point the papers have moved between my agency and the doctor’s office. I got the papers from the doctor today but before he handed them to me he said,

“Don’t freak out when you look at these.”


There’s a portion in the documentation that asks the official opinion of the medical provider whether he thinks this condition could worsen. He says she could still have episodes of wheezing that, at its worse, could require CPR.

Well crap. Thanks for that confidence boost, there doc.

What else am I supposed to do with that other than freak out?

C’mon, man. Really. Haven’t we had enough drama? Let’s take a little break.

It is very rare that this could happen. But he wanted us to be aware. The best way to prevent this is to keep her away from any allergens; no pets, no mold, no dust, no smoke – no matter what. Or she could relapse.

Duly noted.

The boys and I went and finished up our Christmas shopping for Kelley this afternoon. They both grabbed the same thing at the same time. It’s pretty cool. I took it as a sign that if they both picked the same thing it must be right. So we got it. I think she’ll like it. They have pretty good taste.

Presents to wrap and cookies to bake and decorate. Merry Christmas.


A Little Bit of Good News

She did better last night.

Still not checking out of Hotel Children’s any time soon but this sickness is getting further and further behind us.

Doctor came by this morning and felt like the reasons we moved her to SCU have all been relieved and believes she could safely be moved back to a private room. However, as of 9 AM today there are no vacancies anywhere in the hospital.

So, for all of you who are offering prayers, here is our immediate request.

We need to get Rosie out of SCU and into a private room where we can provide for her more readily.

She is not comfortable here and neither are we. The visiting schedule is so fragmented that sleep hasn’t come easily for any of us. Kelley and I did trade off a bit of sleep last night and this morning. But it would be so beneficial to get us all back on a more regular schedule.

So, if you’d like to pray for something specific, we want to move into a private room today. To do that, someone(s) will have to be discharged; add them to your prayers as well.

We love you all so much. Thank you again and again for the letters, emails, comments, re-tweets, texts, gifts, food, coffee, hotel room, clothes, prayers, visits and conversations.

There is no unit of measure to quantify the love and appreciation we feel toward each of you.

Your support is our strength.


First// let me say a very broad and widespread ‘thank you’ to each of you around the world who have spoken Rosie’s name in a prayer.

For you, let me be the first to tell you that she is showing some improvement. This morning, the doctor had a brilliant hypothesis based on the two things we know for certain; she has RSV and she had a metal scope in her lungs. The RSV, being a virus, has no cure other than waiting and no treatment besides oxygen. The aggrivation from the scope though could be contributing to the labored breathing Rosie has been experiencing. He ordered a steroid shot for her and about an hour later she was exhibiting noticable improvements.

Now, she is by no means all better but there is no doubt she is improving.

I know there have been countless Pray-ers authoring petitions to heaven from all points earthbound. I know of a parish in Des Moines. A hamlet in San Francisco. Urban neighbors in Raleigh. Townships in Virginia, Pennsylvania and Delaware. And those are just the ones from the past 24 hours. The outpouring has been encouraging.

Our next request is that we get moved back out of Special Care Unit (SCU) and into a room tomorrow. The doctor is hopeful after checking in on her this afternoon that we’ll be out of SCU and into a private room again by morning. She is not fully recovered but getting through tonight without incident and with continued improvement will move us back into a room and back on track to her recovery.

So, again… thank you, each of you for all your prayers.

Next// I’d like to invite a bit of interactivity. I’ve talked with some of you at different times regarding prayer. And just about everyone had a different perspective on the reasons and the methods and the benefits of prayer. Some say, ’It’s easy. Just as natural as conversation.’ Others say, ‘Prayer is a way to bombard the gates of heaven and fight against the evil forces of hell.’ And still some say, ‘It is the opportunity to participate in something larger and beyond ourselves.’

Prayer, at times seems so logical. And at the same time so mysterious it refuses logic.

So, I’d like to put it to you//

What is prayer to you?

Why is it important to pray?

What are the benefits of prayer?

Love you all.

We’ve Moved

She didn’t really improve last night. She was on oxygen all night and stayed stable. But there was no improvement. And really her breathing became more and more labored throughout the night. And she’s still throwing up constantly.

So, we’ve been moved to the Special Care Unit. Which is good for her and for her recovery but it is hell for Kelley and I because we aren’t able to be with her except for spotty times throughout the day.

She’s so pitiful right now. And there’s nothing that we or the doctors and nurses on our floor have been able to do to make her better. All we can do is make our best efforts to comfort her.

It’s emotionally wrenching.

We just handed off our little baby girl to a group of strangers as they walked behind closing doors while we are forced to sit in a waiting room with strangers huddled up in make-shift beds of paired-up chairs, hiding under blankets and coats waiting to hear something good.

A doctor just came out to have a conversation with another parent about her RSV stricken child. His words to her: “He should get better.” Really? Should? That’s not what I want to hear.

Oh, wait… they’re calling us back.